Monday, May 18, 2009

Downtown Manchester

I took a few photos in downtown Manchester, NH yesterday. (Yes, Manchester NH is named after Manchester, England. Both towns had large textile mills. But my post today has nothing to do with textiles.)

I picked out things that were pretty or interesting to me. Manchester is a mixed bag of architecture....so this is definitely a selective view of things.


Victorian Commercial Block


Curious Squirrel


Interesting Roof-lines


Mixture of old and new

Manchester has been a center of commerce and industry for many years, so within a single block the architecture is often of different eras and styles. In several cases, the architecture in a single building is in different styles.


Owl above the Library Door


Public Library

Magnolia planted very close to the Institute of Art.

This picture is interesting at our house because we also have a magnolia planted rather close to our house. With pruning, the building and tree can co-exist.


I love this building!


Chestnut blossoms remind me of candles


Tallest Building in New Hampshire (20 stories)


Chair sign


City Hall

Manchester was one of the first planned cities with the grid system for roads in New England. It was developed because of a 50 foot waterfall on the Merrimack River and the resulting water power that could run a large textile mill. Within a few years of founding mills in Lowell, MA, the same group of owners founded the mills in Manchester. The mills ceased operation in the early 20th century.




9 comments:

penny-wise people said...

Beautiful photos! I love the chair sign - and the owl over the library door. Made me smile!

Sharon said...

I really enjoyed your architectural tour. It's hard to believe we live in the same country. Everything is so big! Our "old" is the Victorian painted ladies of San Francisco or Spanish missions along the coast.

India said...

How nice to walk around with you in Manchester! I often tells people that they should look up on the buildings. The houses often have interesting architecture if you just raise your eyes. Thank you for the beautiful photos.

Jennifer said...

I am always amazed at your tours! I was first admiring the many different branches of the tree (what a great weaving I thought) and then loved the surprise of the squirrel! Thanks for sharing!

Alice said...

It is always fun to read your blog. I came here for the weaving but I LOVE the tours and photos.

Theresa said...

Thanks for the tour Sue! I needed that. :-)
Could you take some pictures of lobsters for me? LOL

Life Looms Large said...

Thanks for the positive comments you guys!!

Photographing places we visit helps me see them through different eyes - and I hope will inspire all of us in different ways in our creative endeavors!

It's interesting how in the western US, the northeastern US can seem old - while to Europeans, our oldest buildings might be relatively young.

India - thanks for commenting! I hadn't seen your blog before, but now I'll be following along! I love how the Google Reader can automatically translate blogs so that I can somewhat understand them!

Theresa....you know that they can ship lobsters anywhere, right?? Just saying! (Doesn't a certain "patient" owe you one or two??)

Thanks!!

Sue

Theresa said...

They can Sue but to date hypocrite that I am, I cannot bring myself to off them myself. I hate to spend $125.00 plus for what I COULD have had at 2 for $19.95! ;-)
The lobsters will have to wait until I can get there later in the summer. If I time it right, corn and fresh blueberries should be in season and I can eat like a queen on the New England bounty.

Life Looms Large said...

Oooh - that's pricey! We threaten to send lobsters, but we never do!

I make an excellent blueberry tart....in August!!

And our good weather will continue into October....the leaves are my favorites!! (Although after the leaves, is my least favorite!)

Sue